Travel PICU Nurse Jobs

Make a Difference as a PICU Travel Nurse

Caring for children in critical condition is your calling as a PICU nurse. When you use your skills as a travel nurse, you get to do a job you love, feel fulfilled at each day's end, explore new cities and spaces, and of course, make some pretty great cash. Live and work in the location of your dreams and get paid to do it.

What is a traveling PICU nurse?

The PICU RNs – or Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Nurses – are responsible for providing direct patient care to the pediatric patient population in the PICU, including assessment, nursing interventions, and education. Pediatric ICU nurses are part of a team that provides care for critically ill children and infants with complex medical problems, which may include mechanical ventilation, dialysis, transplantation, or other life-saving procedures. PICU RNs are also heavily involved with patients’ families and physicians to help determine the best course of care and recovery.

 

Typical PICU Nurse Responsibilities:

  • Provide round-the-clock care and closely monitor patients' vital signs
  • Administer prescribed medications
  • Utilize advanced medical equipment
  • Execute complex interventions as prescribed by the medical team
  • Update the healthcare team and family members about the patient's progress and conditions
  • Provide emotional support and guidance to families during these stressful times

Choose where you go

With opportunities for travelers all over the country, we’ve selected areas with the most popular medical traveling jobs to help you find your best fit.

Advantages & Perks for Travel PICU Nursing Jobs

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Competitive pay
Travel nurses are the backbone of medical traveling. Pay transparency means you can see what you'll actually get paid before you even apply.
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Per diem
Travel nurses qualify for a weekly, tax-free per diem that can help you cover the cost of moving, like your transportation, meals, and other expenses.
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Certifications
Level-up, PICU nurse. Get your state licenses and travel nurse requirements reimbursed.
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Travel life
See new spaces. See new faces. Grow and learn in your nursing career as you grow and learn in various cities all over the country.

Travel Nursing Compliance & Licensure

Being a travel pediatric intensive care unit nurse is a great way to grow your experience and learn on the job. What if your dream travel assignment is asking for certifications you don’t have? Don’t sweat. You’ll get training in nursing and financial assistance for the cost of licensing and certifications!

Degrees and Certifications

Keeping up with the world of licensing and certification can be intimidating. Degrees and certifications depend on your modality and specialty but getting compliant for your home state and others you want to travel to are easier as a medical professional. Compliance experts work with your recruiter and the facility to ensure that you have all the relevant credentials required for any and all PICU travel nurse jobs.

Compliance Requirements

Some of your compliance requirements are the same across the board, but there are others that will depend on your specialty in nursing.

The three parts of compliance

  • Occupational health records: Required immunizations and health examinations
  • Documentation: Tax forms, insurance paperwork, and licenses
  • Testing: Certifications, online training, and workplace safety exams

FAQs

Who can become a pediatric ICU travel nurse?

Becoming a pediatric intensive care nurse can be a rewarding and fulfilling experience. To become a travel PICU nurse, you'll need to first earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). Once you have your BSN, apply for licensure as a registered nurse through the nursing board in your state. After that, you'll need additional experience as a pediatric nurse, preferably in pediatric intensive care.

It is recommended that travel PICU nurses have two years of hospital-based RN experience in their field. Depending on the specialty or the specific requirements of the facility, the required job experience could be longer. With hard work, dedication, and commitment, you can achieve your goal of becoming a pediatric nurse and make a difference in the lives of children.

What is the average salary of pediatric ICU nurses?

The salary of a registered nurse can vary significantly depending on the experience of the nurse as well as the experience, certifications, and location they are working. The median salary for a registered nurse was $ 80,010 per year or $36.22 per hour in 2020 with most earning between $61,630 and $93,590 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Entry-level registered nurse jobs or those with the lowest 10% salary earned around $53,410, while the highest 10% earned more than $116,230. Typically, a PICU RN travel job will provide higher hourly and weekly pay than permanent positions in the same location, especially for critical care units like medical-surgical units.

Are there any common PICU nursing certifications I should consider?

Yes! There are several advanced certifications registered nurses can pursue to enhance their expertise and skills in the PICU field. These include Certified Pediatric Nurse (CPN) offered by the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board (PNCB), and Critical Care Registered Nurse (CCRN) provided by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN).

Travel nursing professionals should also maintain Basic Life Support (BLS) certification as well as Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and can complete the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) to advance their marketability in the field.

Where are jobs available for PICU nurses?

PICU nurses work in specialized units within pediatric hospitals, known as pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). These units are specifically designed to provide highly specialized care to critically ill infants, children, and adolescents. PICU nurses work alongside a team of healthcare professionals, including physicians, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists, to provide round-the-clock care to the most vulnerable patients.

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